Fuzzy what?

Excuse me while I interrupt our normally scheduled weekday silence.  It seems I left a rather important step out of our last post. Oops!  I had completed the task a few weeks prior and it completely slipped my mind by the time I started the post last week. 

Several yeas ago, when I attempted to start seeds for the first time, the majority of the soil I used became “fuzzy” and many of the seedlings quickly failed due to something called, “dampening off”.  All soil contains soilborne pathogens, bacteria, fungus, diseases etc.  Many of them are good; however, in the right conditions, the “badies” will harm your plant.

To help prevent any issues, you should sterilize your soil.  Essentially, you are going to “bake” your soil.  Much like microwaving or baking your eggshells (previous post) gets rid of bad pathogens, baking your soil does the same thing. It’s a process called, sterilization (also called pasteurization).

This process will give your plants the best environment possible by killing off any bad organisms and weed seeds that may still be in the soil.  It’s really important to do if you are reusing potting soil or using dirt gathered from your garden or even if you are using purchased soil.  You may hear commercially sold soil is sterile. I’m not sure how true that it – the soil I used that sprouted fuzz was a brand new bag, with a well know name on it.

All this sounds complicated, right?  It’s really not and your soil can be safely used as soon as it cools.  There are several methods you can use to sterilize your soil,  We’ll start with the easiest and end with, what I feel is, the hardest method and one that I’m not sure I’m ready to try… just yet.

1. Use the SUN!  
This method works best in warm weather. Select a very sunny spot in your yard that gets at least 8 hours of sunlight.  Lay out a tarp or plastic sheeting and cover with about 4 inches of soil.  Spray with water until very moist but not muddy.  Cover with plastic sheeting or a dark colored tarp, securing the edges with rocks, lumber, garden fabric pins, etc.  Each week, rake the soil around to make sure the heat is being evenly distributed.  Allow the soil to bake in the sun for 4-6 weeks (longer if the weather is cool).

2. Microwave
This is a small batch method.  Fill a microwave safe, glass container with 4 inches (or less) of MOIST soil and place it in the microwave.  Heat it at full power for about 2-5 minutes or until the interior temperature reaches about 180°F.  Take the container out and wrap in towels to allow the soil to cool slowly.

3. Oven
This is a small batch method. Preheat oven to 200°F. Fill an ovenproof container with 4 inches (or less) of MOIST soil and cover with aluminum foil to keep the heat in. Bake until the internal temperature reaches about 180°F.  This takes about 30 minutes.  Take the container out and wrap in towels to allow the soil to cool slowly.

4. Steam
Sterilizing soil with steam can be done with or without a pressure cooker.

  • Pressure Cooker – pour in enough water that it is just below the rack.  Place a shallow pan of soil with 4 inches (or less) of MOIST soil on top of the rack.  Cover the pan with foil.  Close the lid of the cooker, leaving the steam valve open just enough to allow steam to escape until it’s ready to be closed.  Heat at 10 pounds of pressure for 15-30 minutes. Allow soil to cool and then remove from pot.
  • Regular Pot – if you’re not using a pressure cooker, a regular cooking pot will work. Pour enough water that it is just below the rack.  Place a shallow pan of soil with 4 inches (or less) of MOIST soil on top of the rack.  Cover pan with foil.  Close the lid of the pan and allow to the water to boil for 30 minutes, making sure you leave the lid cracked enough to prevent pressure from building up.  Allow soil to cool and then remove from pot.
Moistening the soil prior to baking
Moist soil, covered with foil in the oven
Almost ready. Needs to be closer to 180°

Some tips

  • To moisten the soil quickly, use warm water – it absorbs better.
  • DO NOT overbake the soil as it can release harmful toxins into the air. It can also kill beneficial organisms. Stop baking if the soil begins to emit a strong odor.
  • Sterilize your used pots, trays and garden tools by soaking them for 30 minutes in 10% solution of household bleach & warm water.
  • Store sterilized soil in a clean bucket or container.

Do you sterilize your soil?  Have any tips?  Leave them in the comments below. 

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This post was shared on The Homesteader Hop

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Content and Photos by Misty Meadows Homestead and S.Lago © All Rights Reserved 

In the Garden – Starting Seeds

About this time, every year, my heart starts to tire of the winter weather I cherish so much–I doubt there are many who appreciate snow as much as I do.  It’s still a little early for starting seeds, at least here in USDA Plant Hardiness Zone 8a.  Having grown in zones 8b & 5-6, we are very excited to see what this new zone has in store for us.

Over the past few weeks, our mailbox has been filling up with a delightful assortment of seed catalogs.  They are always so much fun to look through.  My favorites are Territorial Seeds and Baker Creek Seeds.  The Baker Creek Catalog is gorgeous and is more like a coffee table book.

If by chance you are ready for spring, over the next few weeks, we will be giving you some tips to get your 2017 garden off to a great start!  And, we have some exciting news (and a freebie!) that we will be sharing with you at the end of this post!!

This week – Starting seeds.

When I say starting, I mean starting INDOORS.  It’s still a bit too early in much of the country, even if you could break the frozen tundra with your garden spade, to even begin planting outdoors.  Starting seeds indoors is simple and you don’t need a lot of fancy equipment or even a greenhouse.

I like starting my seeds in empty egg cartons, using the empty egg shells as a sort of pot. The egg shells can be planted along with the mature seedling and will break down, providing much-needed nutrients to your plant.

To start seeds in on egg carton you will need:

  • An egg carton
  • 12 egg shell halves
  • Potting soil
  • And a sharp object to poke holes
  • Seeds!

The first thing I do is pull out my “Seed Binder” – yes, seed binder. I find this helps me keep my seeds better organized.  Everyone organizes their seeds differently and you will find what works out best for you.  The inserts are actually made to hold baseball cards! Folded over, the seed packets fit nicely in the pockets.

img_7618     img_7636

Next, make sure your eggshells are clean and dry.  Microwaving them for a minute or two will get rid of any bad pathogens

Cut off the lid of the egg carton and set it aside.  You can use it later to start additional seedlings.

Take a sharp object, like a nail or toothpick, and poke a hole in each section and in the bottom of each egg to help with water drainage.

img_7619  img_7620

Place eggshells back in the carton and fill each eggshell with soil.

img_7621-1  img_7622

Make a slight indentation in the soil of each egg, lay a couple of seeds in the divot you created and cover lightly with soil.

img_7628-1  img_7629  img_7630

Water your eggshells well, making sure the soil is damp.

Cover with plastic.  A couple of years ago, I bought some clear bread bags; they aren’t really long enough for the bread I make but they are perfect for this!  The bag helps retain both moisture and warmth, creating a mini greenhouse.

img_7631

Place the egg carton in a warm, sunny windowsill.  You can see in the picture above that condensation is already forming.  That’s a good sign!

The seed packet should tell you how long it will take for those seeds to germinate.  It’s usually anywhere from 7-21 days.  So, sit back, and wait.

Don’t forget to lightly water your seedlings about every 2 days or sooner if you see them drying out.  I like using a small spray bottle.  Don’t drown them, just mist.

Once your seedlings emerge from the soil, they will need light.  Many people place their seeds in a very sunny window. Usually, a south facing window will receive the most light.  Unfortunately, here in the Pacific Northwest, we need to supplement with a grow light.  We will talk about that next time.

While you’re waiting for your seedlings to emerge, you should start thinking about a couple of things:

Re-potting:  When a seed first emerges from the soil, it has a set of two round leaves. These leaves are called cotyledons, which are part of the seed and act as it’s food source. As the seedling grows, it will form two more leaves that look more like what the plant’s true leaves look like.  When this happens, the plant begins photosynthesizing, receiving energy through that process.

Transplanting outdoors: After the threat of frost has passed, you can remove the seedling and shell from the carton or from its pot if you have repotted and plant in your garden.

We will be going into more depth about these topics in the weeks to come – so, come back and visit us!

Now for the exciting news!  With you in mind, we have created an amazing tool – the 2017 Printable “My Garden Planner”!!  This planner will fit nicely in a binder and will help you stay organized, helping you have a much better garden experience–you will refer to this journal year after year and throughout the growing season(s).  You’ll find very helpful logs, planners, charts and tips inside.

We have THREE versions available:

etsy2Extreme Printable 2017 Garden Journal (30+pages!)
This 30+page Journal has been designed for the more experienced gardener or the beginner who is ready to jump in feet first.  The PDF will print out landscape (11″x8.5″) and fits nicely in a standard 3-ring binder.

 

etsy-cover-copyExtreme MINI Printable “My Garden Journal” – 5.5″ x 8.5″ – Mini Binder Half Sheet Size
NEW!! This is our Extreme MINI Printable “My Garden Journal” – the 15+page PDF will print out on an 8 ½” x 11″ sheet of paper. It has been designed to be printed out, cut in half (giving you 30+pages), and hole punched to fit the 5 ½” x 8 ½” mini binder. Due to its small size, this version does not have the helpful tips.

 

etsy-1-liteLITE Version Printable 2017 Garden Journal (10 pages!)
This 10-page Journal has been designed for a beginning gardener or a weekend gardener.  The PDF will print out landscape (11″x8.5″) and fits nicely in a standard 3-ring binder.

 

These AMAZING bundles includes (*indicates what is in the LITE version)

  • Cover Page*
  • Table of Contents*
  • General Garden Information *
  • Weekly Planner
  • Monthly Calendar *
  • Seasonal Garden Chores
  • Garden Projects
  • Daily Weather Observations
  • Monthly Weather Observations *
  • Spring Garden Plot Sketch *
  • Fall Garden Plot Sketch
  • Square Foot Gardening Sketch
  • Seed Inventory
  • Seeds to Purchase *
  • Soil and Amendments *
  • Individual Plant Profile
  • Seedlings Started *
  • Succession Planting Chart
  • Rainfall & Irrigation *
  • Pest & Disease Treatment *
  • Transplant & Direct Sow
  • Companion Planting
  • Season’s Harvest *
  • Harvest Preservation*
  • Crop RoRotationlan
  • Seed Saving
  • Seed Saving Packets
  • Seed Saving Test

They are available in our Etsy Shop AND the EXTREME versions are on sale through the end of February!!! Use Code: 2017FebWP at checkout

Finally, Mr. Misty and I would like to offer you our “Seedlings Started” page as our gift to help you get started on your gardening journey!!

a-gift

Click here to download your copy today!

Have you started seeds before?  Have any tips?  Leave them in the comments below. 


This post was shared on The Homesteader Hop

If you like this post, please feel free to share and please click the follow button on the side or return to Misty Meadows Homestead to follow our adventures… Oh!  Wait!  Before you go – don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel!  Thanks!


Content and Photos by Misty Meadows Homestead and S.Lago © All Rights Reserved 


The Buzz 

I can hardly beelieve it’s already February!  Is it just me or does this year seem to be buzzing by?  In a few short months, Misty Meadows Homestead will be welcoming some very busy new members to our family.  Mr. Misty are so excited about this we have been buzzy… er… busy taking classes getting ready for their arrival!

Can you guess who will be making their home at Misty Meadows?

Yes, honey bees!


I’ve been fascinated with bees since I was a small girl.  My grandpa was a displaced Illinois farm boy living in a residential area in Southern California; despite the county rules and much to the annoyance of his neighbors (who were easily bought off with honey), he was a beekeeper.  I can remember summers with my cousins, running through the morning dew, out to his shed to watch him extract honey.  Oh, the sweetness of the comb he would treat us with if we kind and well-behaved.

(Image from Extension.org)

Honey bees, Apis mellifera (not to be confused with wasps or yellow jackets or hornets which tend to be “predators”) aren’t just for producing honey – though that is one of the sweetest rewards of beekeeping – for many of us who garden, we know how important bees are.  Bees are “pollinators” and without pollination, many crops would fail.

According to ancient rock paintings in Spain and Zimbabwe, though better defined as honey “robbing”, humans have been harvesting honey for almost 8,000 years.  It would be a few thousand years later before people, specifically, the Egyptians would enter into a mutually beneficial relationship with honey bees and beekeeping began to develop into what it is today.  With over 20,000 known species throughout the world today, bees are a valuable commodity for those of us who rely on them to pollinate our food sources.

Honey Bees (also known as European Honey Bees) are not native to North America.  The first honeybees to arrive in with English settlers around 1622 and began their slow westward migration. I read that by the 18th century, Native Americans called honey bees the “white man’s fly” because once they saw bees, they knew settlers weren’t too far behind.

Though a nuisance at times, bees are one of the only beneficial insects to have been introduced to our country.

They need our help!

In the 1970-80’s, a parasite called, hasdVarroa mite was introduced to the US via the Asian honey bee, Apis cerana.  Due to Apis cerana’s life cycle, the mite tends not to be quite as destructive to that bee, however, for Apis melifera, it had devastating consequences. The mite attaches itself to the honey bee, extracting something called, hemolymph, which is like our blood, weakening the bee and even transmitting destructive viruses.  Because of this and possibly the increased use of pesticides, bee populations are on the decline.

Can you imagine a world without honey bees, their wax, their honey, their pollination?

We can’t.

So, we have been trying to make a difference.  Over the past few years, we have been using natural ways to remove and prevent pests, only using harsher chemicals when all else has failed and never using them during peak pollination hours.  Now, we are going to raise bees — educating ourselves and others about their benefits.

You can help too!!

Here are a few things you can do to help:

BeeCome a beekeeper.  

Bee conscious.
Realize bees aren’t out to sting you.  They know they will die if they sting you, so they will only do that when in danger.  Learn the difference beeTween beneficial bees (which include mason bees, bumble bees, and honey bees) and predators like wasps, yellowjackets & hornets and work on eliminating the predators from our property.

Plant bee-friendly plants, flowering herbs & trees:

  • Beebalm
  • Blueberries
  • Borage
  • Clover
  • Echinacea
  • Oregano
  • Raspberries
  • Sage
  • Sunflowers
  • Thyme
  • Yarrow
  • Cherry Tree
  • Orange tree
  • Poplar tree

… just to name a few.

Eliminate garden/yard pesticide use.
MotherEarth News has some great tips on this click here for their article on organic pest control.

Bee selective. 
Don’t mow your dandelions – it’s one of the earliest and best wild forages for bees.

Support your local beekeeper and beekeeper association.

Buy local honey and beeswax.

And, don’t mind your own beeswax – bee an advocate!
Contact your state and local representatives about your concerns.

We are very excited about this newest adventure.  We hope you will join us!

Do you keep bees?  Have any tips?  Leave them in the comments below. 

If you like this post, please feel free to share and please click the follow button on the side or return to Misty Meadows Homestead to follow our adventures… Oh!  Wait!  Before you go – don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel!  Thanks!


This post was shared on The Homesteader Hop


Content and Photos by Misty Meadows Homestead and S.Lago © All Rights Reserved 


In the Garden – Viability of a Seed

For the next several weeks our Friday post will focus on helping you have a more successful garden experience this year, starting with seeds.

Before purchasing your seeds it’s a good idea to determine which plants you want to grow and how many you are going to need. For tips on this, see our previous post “Grow a Year’s Worth of Produce”.

Seed Packet/Envelopes

If you’re anything like me, you probably have a stack of seeds from last year or maybe even from several years. Growing plants from seed is the cheapest way to get your garden started and it will give you a greater variety of plants to chose from than the seedlings your might purchase from your local home and garden store.

   

You’ll notice every seed packet is different, but they all pretty much have the same information.

  • Name of the Plant (Common & often Latin).
  • Variety.
  • The number of seeds or weight of seeds.
  • Annual, Biennial or Perennial – annuals only live for one year and need to be replanted. Biennials take two years to complete their life cycle.  Perennials will come back year after year.
  • Days to Germination – this is how long it should take for your seed sprout to emerge.
  • Days to Maturity – this is the time it takes your plant to reach bearing age.  This information, along with days to harvest is particularly important for those of us with relatively short growing seasons.
  • Days to Harvest – this date is usually based on when the seed is direct sown or when the seedling is transplanted into the garden.
  • Planting Instructions – how to plant the seed, depth, and spacing, amount of sunlight, etc.
  • Whether it’s an Heirloom, Hybrid or an Open-Pollinated Seeds – All Heirloom seeds are Open-Pollinated (OP) but not all OP seeds are old enough (50+ years) to have a proven track record that would give them the Heirloom designation.  As long as pollen is not shared between different varieties within the same species, then the seed produced by Heirlooms and OP will remain true-to-type year after year.  Hybrid (sometimes called FI) – Are NOT GMO related. They are created through selective breeding that can enhance their disease resistance and increase production. While this sounds great, these seeds should not be collected and saved for used next year as the plant may have different characteristics than the one produced by the original seed.
  • Packaging Date or Expiration Date – though the package may indicate the seeds are only viable for that growing season, most are still good to use, as long as stored properly, for several more years.


Seed Viability

The viability of your seeds is very important, especially if you are using seeds from previous years or seeds you have saved from your garden or seeds others have given you.


Testing your seeds viability (germination rate) is easy – you will need the following items:

  • Seeds to be tested.
  • A spray bottle with tap water.
  • A paper towel.
  • Ziplock type baggie.
  1. Fold the paper towel in half and moisten well.
  2. Place 5 seeds on one-half of the paper towel and fold in half.
  3. Place in a marked zipper bag and
  4. place in a warm spot like on top of your refrigerator and wait until the package says the seeds should germinate.

If the seeds are good, most of them will germinate.  If they don’t, you might consider purchasing new seeds.

Don’t throw out the seed that germinated.  Carefully plant them in some soil and treat them as you would a new seedling.  We’ll talk more about that next week.

Now for the exciting news! We have created an amazing tool – the 2017 Printable “My Garden Planner“!!

This Journal 30+ page has been designed to be printed landscape (11″x8.5”) and fits nicely in a standard 3-ring binder. You’ll find very helpful logs, planners, charts and tips which will not only help you stay organized but, as a result of being organized, you’ll have a much better gardening experience–you will refer year after year to this amazing journal.

blog

And it’s available, through the month of February for 25% off in our Etsy store!!

Use code: 2017FebWP.

Get yours today and get your 2017 gardening season off to a great start!

Do you have any tips for starting seeds or do you have questions we or one of our awesome readers can answer? Leave a comment below!

Ps. Next week we will talk about getting a jump start on your growing season by starting your seeds indoors. I hope you’ll visit us again then.

If you like this post, please feel free to share and please click the follow button on the side or return to Misty Meadows Homestead to follow our adventures… Oh!  Wait!  Before you go – don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel!  Thanks!


This post was shared on The Homesteader Hop


Content and Photos by Misty Meadows Homestead and S.Lago © All Rights Reserved 


Pin Me Please

Musings & More – You’ve Been Missed

After a storm dumped about 3 feet of snow on us, not only did we lose power (yes, we have a generator), we also lost phone and internet service (no fix for that, we had to wait it out).  It was actually nice being disconnected for a few days… after the initial anxiety wore off.  Lol!  

And, it was nice coming back and catching up with you all and reading your posts… though we were gone, nothing really changed, which was a relief.  

Anyway, we are back up and working on blogs – so stay tuned! 

If you like this post, please feel free to share and please click the follow button on the side or return to Misty Meadows Homestead to follow our adventures… Oh!  Wait!  Before you go – don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel!  Thanks!


Content and Photos by Misty Meadows Homestead and S.Lago © All Rights Reserved 


Survival Sunday – Get Home Bag

I don’t know where you live, but where we live, right now, we are experiencing some pretty chilly weather.  It’s not uncommon for our roads to be covered with snow or ice. More now than ever it’s important to talk about being prepared.

Are you prepared for any disaster: storm, earthquake, civil unrest or?

Today, I bring you the “Get Home Bag”. A GHB is just as the name implies, A small bag that containing supplies you may need to make your way home during a disaster/event, because, that walk home is going to be much harder than the 15-20 minutes it took you to drive to work (or where ever you are, away from home).

This bag can also help you if you get stuck for hours in winter weather traffic.

A few items to consider when making your GHB:

  • A backpack works best, but some go larger, using duffle bags or smaller, using fanny packs.
  • Extra medication along with Tylenol or Motrin
  • First aid kit
  • N95 face mask
  • Sunscreen & bug spray
  • Toilet paper & wet wipes & female person care items
  • Change of weather appropriate clothes
  • Walking shoes or hiking boots
  • Extra socks
  • Hat, bandana & sunglasses
  • Work gloves
  • Mylar blanket
  • Rain poncho
  • Lightweight tarp
  • Rope / paracord
  • Multi-tool
  • Fire starter / lighter / matches
  • Flashlight & extra batteries
  • Water and/or water purification tabs or water filter & a metal water bottle you could use to boil water in if you had too
  • Food – energy dense, easy prep (protein bars/trail mix)
  • Battery operated radio & extra batteries
  • Paper & pencil
  • Cell phone charging block
  • Paper map & compass
  • Rescue signal item
  • Personal defense items
  • Cash

Of course, this isn’t a complete list, it does give you some idea of what you need to have, in each of your vehicles, to keep you going for at least 24-72 hours. You might even consider some items of comfort: hard candy, MP3 player, favorite hand lotion. I keep a copy of a medicinal/edible wild plant book in mine.

Check out our blog about Bug Out Bags, why you need one and what you should have in it.

Do you carry a GHB?  What do you have in yours?  Please comment below.

 

 


Content and Photos by Misty Meadows Homestead and S.Lago © All Rights Reserved


In the Garden – Keeping a Garden Journal

***Would you like 50% off our either of our EXTREME “My Garden Journals”? Follow this blog and our facebook page (www.facebook.com/MistyMeadowsHomestead). Leave us a message that you have done so, along with an email address (we wont share it or use it again) and we will send you a exclusive 50% off that can be used for either of the EXTREME “My Garden Journals”, the regular or the mini!***

Who among us hasn’t held a conversation with a plant?  They make great companions and counselors – any time I’m in my garden I find myself talking to them and if you’re lucky, you may even hear me singing to them and they don’t laugh nearly as hard at me as you surely would!  Haha!

Over the past few years, I have found keeping a garden journal to be an invaluable resource before, during and after the growing season.  It is where I track what worked, what didn’t, my successes, epic failures and everything in between. 

I usually begin in the depths of winter, when the fatigue of the frigid season has gotten the best of me and my heart and soul are longing for the warmth that spring brings with it.  I  start thinking about which plants I’d like to grow and making lists of the seeds I currently have on hand and those I need to purchase or trade for.  Yes, trade.  There are several group on facebook that focus on seed trading.  My favorites are:

Do some research – you might even find a local group or start one yourself!  It’s a great way to get seeds you have been wanting but aren’t easily found and a way to get rid of seeds you have too many of or just aren’t fond of.

As winter progresses, I begin tracking how many weeks before my last frost date I need to plant a particular seed, the date I actually plant the seed and when I transplant it in the garden.  Once transplanted, I note when I water and fertilize, if and when it’s been treated for disease or pests and when it should be harvested.  I make notes about problems and ideas for next year.  And finally, during the harvest, I note what, when and how much was harvested and any final notes about the season.

Here’s the Grarden Journal/Planner I created a couple of years ago.  I wasn’t very fancy but it got the basic job done.  I always wanted to add a bit more to it, but would find myself too busy while in the midst of the growing season to even contemplate creating something more substantial and long lasting.  I always tell myself, next year, next year I will create something better to keep myself organized. 

   

Next year finally came!  

Over the past month or so, while the snow on the ground prevented us from completing many other tasks, we were able to sit down and create a comprehensive garden journal.  It started as tool for us, but it grew into something even better!  We began thinking about our gardening friends, especially those juse starting our and what they might want or need in a garden journal.  We even went to a few experienced gardeners for tips and ideas.  What came from all the research was a garden journal that has everything you could imagine to help any gardener, experienced or not, stay organized.  

Now for some exciting news…

With you, our gardening friends, in mind, we have created an amazing tool – the 2017 Printable “My Garden Planner”!!

This Journal has been designed to be printed landscape (11″x8.5″) and fits nicely in a standard 3-ring binder.  You’ll find very helpful logs, planners, charts and tips which will not only help you stay organized but as a result of being organized you’ll have a much better gardening experience–you will refer year after year to this journal.

And, it’s available in our Etsy Store!

We have two versions:  The LITE with 10+pages geared toward the beginning gardener and the EXTREME with 30+ pages geared toward the more experienced gardener or even the beginning gardener who is ready to jump in feet first.

etsy2  
*Extreme version of the 2017 Printable “My Garden Journal $12.99
(Use this coupon code: 2017FebWP for 25%off discount expires 2/28/17)
This version has everything a gardener could hope for, 30+pages that fit comfortably in a standard binder.

  1. • Cover Page
  2. • Table of Contents
  3. • General Garden Information
  4. • Weekly Planner
  5. • Monthly Calendar
  6. • Seasonal Garden Chores
  7. • Garden Projects
  8. • Daily Weather Observations
  9. • Monthly Weather Observations
  10. • Moon Phases
  11. • Spring Garden Plot Sketch
  12. • Fall Garden Plot Sketch
  13. • Square Foot Gardening Sketch
  14. • Crop Rotation Plan
  15. • Companion Planting Chart
  16. • Succession Planting Chart
  17. • Produce for a Year Planner 1
  18. • Produce for a Year Planner 2
  19. • Produce for a Year Planner 3
  20. • Seed Inventory
  21. • Seeds to Purchase
  22. • Individual Plant Profile
  23. • Seedlings Started
  24. • Transplant & Direct Sow
  25. • Soil & Amendments
  26. • Rainfall & Irrigation
  27. • Pests & Disease Treatment
  28. • Season’s Harvest
  29. • Season Preservation
  30. • Seed Saving
  31. • Seed Packets
  32. • Saved Seed Test

etsy-1-lite
LITE version of the 2017 Printable “My Garden Journal” $5.99
This version has everything a beginning gardener would need, 10+pages that fit comfortably in a standard binder.

  1. • Cover Page
  2. • Table of Contents
  3. • General Garden Information
  4. • Monthly Calendar
  5. • Monthly Weather Observations
  6. • Spring Garden Plot Sketch
  7. • Seeds to Purchase
  8. • Soil & Amendments
  9. • Seedlings Started
  10. • Rainfall & Irrigation
  11. • Pests & Disease Treatment
  12. • Season’s Harvest


NEW!! NEW!! NEW!! NEW!! NEW!! NEW!! NEW!!  

NEW!! Our Extreme MINI Printable “My Garden Journal” – the PDF will print out on an 8 ½” x 11″ sheet of paper. It has been designed to be printed out, cut in half, and hole punched to fit the 5 ½” x 8 ½” mini binder.

Extreme MINI version of the 2017 Printable “My Garden Journal $9.99
This version has everything a gardener could hope for, 30+pages that fit comfortably in a standard binder.
• Cover Page
• Table of Contents
• General Garden Information
• Weekly Planner
• Monthly Calendar
• Seasonal Garden Chores
• Garden Projects
• Daily Weather Observations
• Monthly Weather Observations
• Moon Phases
• Spring Garden Plot Sketch
• Fall Garden Plot Sketch
• Square Foot Gardening Sketch
• Crop Rotation Plan
• Companion Planting Chart
• Succession Planting Chart
• Produce for a Year Planner 1
• Produce for a Year Planner 2
• Produce for a Year Planner 3
• Seed Inventory
• Seeds to Purchase
• Individual Plant Profile
• Seedlings Started
• Transplant & Direct Sow
• Soil & Amendments
• Rainfall & Irrigation
• Pests & Disease Treatment
• Season’s Harvest
• Season Preservation
• Seed Saving
• Seed Packets
• Saved Seed Test

Even if you don’t purchase our garden journal (though we hope you will, as the money will be going to help us start our first apiary), it will give you an idea of some of the things you might want to put into your own journal.  By having a place to organize your thoughts, plans, dreams for your garden on paper and then track the progress, you will find your 2017 gardening experience to be a great one!

***Would you like 50% off our either of our EXTREME “My Garden Journals”?  Follow this blog and our facebook page (www.facebook.com/MistyMeadowsHomestead).  Leave us a message that you have done so, along with an email address (we wont share it or use it again) and we will send you a exclusive 50% off that can be used for either of the EXTREME “My Garden Journals”, the regular or the mini!***

Are you an experienced gardener?  We’d love to hear from you!  Please feel free to share your suggestions and tips in the comments below.


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Content and Photos by Misty Meadows Homestead and S.Lago © All Rights Reserved


Fitness Friday – Lies We Tell Ourselves

Editors Note:  I wrote this post several months ago, but thought it was worth recycling.  Come January 1st, we all make resolutions and are gung-ho.  If you’re like me, come January 21st, you’re losing your enthusiasm.  Maybe this post will re-ignite the fire in you… and me.  I’ve lost 15# since I originally posted this–not as much as I would have like to have lost, but it’s a loss and I’m grateful for that. Continue reading “Fitness Friday – Lies We Tell Ourselves”

Wild Wednesday


Here at Misty Meadows, Wednesday’s are all about being… Wild! Re-wilding. Wildcrafting. Exploring the wilds of our homestead.

Today we’re going to talk about Continue reading “Wild Wednesday”

In the Garden – Grow a Year’s Worth of Produce

Continue reading “In the Garden – Grow a Year’s Worth of Produce”